Rheumatoid arthritis: Does being pregnant impact signs?

Rheumatoid arthritis signs frequently subside all through being pregnant.

By Mayo Clinic Staff members

Many girls with rheumatoid arthritis, a condition in which your immune program mistakenly assaults your body’s tissues, report enhancement in their signs all through being pregnant. Many also report a flare-up of signs following childbirth, typically within just the initially three months.

Scientists are finding out why these changes come about. For the reason that girls are far more most likely than men to build rheumatoid arthritis, one particular concept is that woman intercourse hormones, estrogen and progesterone, participate in a function.

But girls who choose remedies made up of estrogen — as component of their oral contraceptive or hormone alternative remedy for menopause — typically will not have any modify in their rheumatoid arthritis signs.

During being pregnant, the mother’s immune program changes to stop the rejection of the fetus. Scientists are finding out whether these changes could be linked to an enhancement in rheumatoid arthritis signs.